HME News

JAN 2018

HME News is the monthly business newspaper for home medical equipment providers. This controlled circulation publication reaches 17,100 home medical equipment services providers, including traditional HME dealers & suppliers, hospital- and pharmacy-o

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News 4 www. HMENE ws. COM / j AN u AR y 2019 / HME NE ws Use Data to Grow Your Referral Base Complimentary market report available for a limited Ɵme! www.vgmmarketdata.com/dme With VGM Market Data, the naƟon's most comprehensive DME claims database, you can pinpoint key growth opportuniƟes and • IdenƟfy and rank high-value referral sources for DME products • Find out who is referring paƟents to your compeƟtors • Target your sales team to make the biggest gains Use Data to Grow Your Referral Base Complimentary market report available for a limited Ɵme! With VGM Market Data, the naƟon's most comprehensive DME claims database, IdenƟfy and rank high-value referral sources for DME products Find out who is referring paƟents to your compeƟtors Target your sales team to make the biggest gains info@vgmmarketdata.com │ 844-236-4022 Congress and government agencies to "make better opportunities for people," he says. Here's what Meuser, 54, had to say about how listening is key to accomplishing this. h M e n ews: You first ran to represent Penn- sylvania's 10th congressional district in 2008 . Why do you think you lost that race? Dan Meuser: I hadn't been really active in and wasn't really known in many of the counties that made up that district. I hadn't earned my stripes, so to speak, to be successful in a congressional campaign. I also thought my opponent in the primary—he and I didn't dif- ferentiate ourselves in the eyes of voters. We were both conservatives and businesspeople and new to politics. h M e : After that loss, why stick with politics? Meuser: I really had a desire to be in pub- lic service. During my campaign, I met then State Attorney General Tom Corbett and he strongly encouraged me to be part of his campaign for governor. I had no plans to be revenue secretary, but we saw eye to eye on a number of issues, and when he won, he offered me that position. h M e : How do you look back at the four years you were in that role? Meuser: I feel like I was able to apply business practices to a government agency. I wanted to treat taxpayers like customers, yet also be the tax collector. We focused on efficiency. If you don't waste money, you have more money to invest elsewhere. I let my staff know, if you make these efficiencies, we can buy new lap- tops for our field staff and invest more in IT. I believe in giving people the tools to do their jobs at a high level of excellence. h M e : How did you make the jump from rev- enue secretary to another campaign for the House? Meuser: I began 2017 very much thinking I was going to run for lieutenant governor. b ut when r ep. l ou b arletta, r -Pa., decided to run for Senate, he said he thought I should run for his seat. I know this person who's 93 who says, "Always have a quarter in your pocket in case the bus comes by." I was prepared. h M e : Many in the industry see you as a poten- tially strong ally for HME in Congress . How do you feel you'll be able to help with industry initiatives? Meuser: I'm going to be a strong ally for all U.S. job creators. I believe in government plans that truly help, rather than hinder, people. The government doesn't create jobs; it creates an environment that allows the pri- vate sector to create jobs. I want regulations that make sense. All of these macros indi- rectly impact the HME industry and all other industries. Many of their issues are the same, including being mis-regulated. Too often, these regulators are unaware of the unin- tended consequences to their actions. They don't listen. I'm not really better equipped than anyone else, except that I'm good at listening to people. You have to listen to understand. hM e d AN meu S e R c o n t i n u e d f r o M pa g e 3 By Liz Beau L ieu, e ditor WASHINGTON – Stakeholders also plan to push for transparency on how CMS determines supplier capacity. In the past, the agency has manipulat- ed capacity based on a provider's histori- cal capacity. That means, a provider may submit a bid with a supplier capacity for 100 walkers, but CMS, in looking at the provider's historical capacity, determines it can do 200 walkers. "You have contract suppliers who say, 'I was a winner and because I was the only local supplier, I was forced to do 8,000 walkers, and I don't want to do that many,'" b rummett said. Additionally, stakeholders plan to push for transparency on how CMS determines bonafide bids. "What's the threshold for verification," b rummett said. "We don't feel like CMS More transparency needed on supplier capacity, bonafide bids has anything in writing. If I bid $100 on an item and my product invoice from the manufacturer says $99—to me that's not a sustainable price; it hasn't allotted for overhead, etc. So if a bid is X% below the ceiling, should it auto- matically trigger a verifi- cation?" The introduction of lead-item pricing raises other questions about bonafide bids, including, will the agency apply the verification process just to the lead item, or all items? "We think it should apply to all items," b achenheimer said. o n supplier capacity and bona fide bids, stakeholders plan to make recom- mendations, but they're still "brainstorm- ing" and "tossing around ideas" right now, they say. h M e Reshaping bidding Bachenheimer

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